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Radiology

This tag is associated with 11 posts

American Board of Radiology Certifying Examination – Why 15 months after residency completion?

I am currently studying for the American Board of Radiology Certifying Examination. By far this is the one standardized examination that I have studied the least for. How the board thinks newly minted radiologists can study for an exam and practice in a new job still baffles me. A few years ago the American Board … Continue reading

Radiology Physics – Comparisons of Mammography and General Radiography

The test question writers at the American Board of Radiology seem to be obsessed with comparing mammography and general radiography. The below table should be high yield information for the ABR Core examination and certifying examination. In simple terms, mammography is lower energy, takes longer, generally uses different targets and filters, and is higher resolution. Those are … Continue reading

The Ventricular System of the Brain

The ventricular system is a set of four structures, the ventricles, containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. It is continuous with the central canal of spinal cord. The ventricle lining consists of an epithelium-like membrane called ependyma. The ventricles are interconnected, allowing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid. CSF is produced by the ependymal cells … Continue reading

X-Ray Art – Hugh Turvey, X-Ray Artist

X-ray art is a fusion of visible light and x-rays to create what has been called a “xogram,” a term coined by British photographer and artist Hugh Turvey. He has a fascinating and beautiful portfolio of images, of which you can find a sample from National Geographic. A couple of my favorites are below.

How to Appropriately Order and Obtain a Radiology Test – Three Tips

My motivation for this article came while I was on a recent call shift. I was opening up a chest radiograph on the PACS workstation when I saw the clinical history field (filled in  by the clinician) which read “chest.” That was it. Just “chest.” Not even “pain,” or “chest pain.” Nope, just “chest.” As … Continue reading

Top 10 Cases from 2013

Hey all! Check it out. Below is a list of the top 10 posts from 2013, based on total annual hits. Enjoy! 1. The Differences Between the Male and Female Pelvis 2. The About page 🙂 3. Lung Mass – Differential Diagnosis 4. The Golden S Sign – Right Upper Lobe Collapse.  5. CT Neck … Continue reading

Introduction to Radiology Cases

Buy the book here! Only $0.99 USD! This is a collection of unknown cases and their solutions spanning all modalities of radiology, including plain radiographs, CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, and ultrasound and covering both pediatric and adult radiology. Enjoy!

3 Tips to Formulate an Accurate and Valuable Differential Diagnosis

At the core of diagnostic radiology is the differential diagnosis. This is the set of various diagnoses that may explain certain findings on a particular radiology exam, whether it is a mass seen on ultrasound, an opacity on a chest radiograph, or abnormal signal characteristics on an MRI. I recently came across the quote above … Continue reading

Introducing RadiologyPatient.com

I’ve always wanted to be able to add value to patient care as much as possible. That has sort of been my overall goal as a physician. So I’m introducing a new project of mine called RadiologyPatient. I want to create a community where patients can come and get their questions answered about radiology. Go … Continue reading

Tracking Cumulative Radiation Exposure to Patients

Today the Wall Street Journal published an article here regarding the tracking of cumulative radiation exposure to patients. This issue has come to the forefront in radiology over the last 5 years given the rapidly increasing volume of CT scans performed over the last 10-15 years. The data show that clinicians have increasingly ordered more … Continue reading

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