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Physics

This category contains 5 posts

Radiology Physics – Radioactive Material Package Labels

Packages that arrive to a nuclear medicine department may be labeled with special radioactive labels that have specific allowable limits of radiation depending on the label. As part of the radioisotope safety examination, candidates should be aware of what these labels mean. The captions of each label below have the specific amounts of radiation that each … Continue reading

Radiology Physics – Comparisons of Mammography and General Radiography

The test question writers at the American Board of Radiology seem to be obsessed with comparing mammography and general radiography. The below table should be high yield information for the ABR Core examination and certifying examination. In simple terms, mammography is lower energy, takes longer, generally uses different targets and filters, and is higher resolution. Those are … Continue reading

Radiology Physics – Radionuclides

As a third installment in a series of articles on radiology physics, I’ve included a good summary table of important radionuclides to know for the ABR Core examination. This test also contains a component of the Radioisotope Safety Examination (RISE) which must be passed to obtain an Authorized User status from the ABR. Part of the … Continue reading

Radiology Physics – Acute Radiation Syndromes

In continuation of a series of posts on radiology physics as preparation for the ABR Core Examination, another important set of threshold doses to consider are those for acute radiation syndromes. Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), or radiation sickness, is a serious illness that can happen when a person is exposed to very high levels of radiation, … Continue reading

Radiology Physics – Deterministic effects

For radiology residents preparing for the ABR Core Examination, memorizing the endless numbers that they need to know can seem like a daunting task. One section of the test which is particularly dense with these numbers is the physics section. In preparing for the 2015 administration next week, I thought it would be nice to … Continue reading