Advertisements
//
you're reading...
Chest

Lung Bullae – Bullous emphysema.

History: 50 year old male with chest pain. 

Single frontal radiograph of the chest shows a large right upper lung bulla. Notice left apical lucency, which may be compatible with subpleural blebs versus possible bulla.

Lung Bulla: Single frontal radiograph of the chest shows a large right upper lung bulla. Notice left apical lucency, which may be compatible with subpleural blebs versus possible bulla.

A bulla is a thin-walled hole in the lung that must be larger than 10 mm. The hole contains no parenchyma, and there is a high contrast between the cavity and normal lung parenchyma.

Emphysema is classified typically as either paraseptal or centrilobular (although, another type is called panlobular emphysema). Paraseptal lucencies seen in emphysema are well-demarcated holes in the periphery of lung demarcated by thin-walled septa. Centrilobular lucencies are well-defined holes in the centrilobular portion of the secondary pulmonary lobule. Large apical predominant bulla are commonly seen in paraseptal emphysema.

Bullae are seen in multiple entities such as cocaine smoking, pulmonary sarcoidosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Marfan’s syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and inhaled fiberglass exposure.

Advertisements

About radiologypics

I am a radiology physician from California, USA.

Discussion

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Unilateral Hyperlucent Hemithorax Mnemonic – CRAWLS | RADIOLOGYPICS.COM - March 16, 2013

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: